February 7, 2024 | Allison Robertson

The Grand Canyon: America’s Most Deadly National Park


The Grand Canyon: America’s Most Deadly National Park

The Grand Canyon is one of the Seven Wonders of the World, and one of America’s most popular tourist attractions.

Aside from its stunning natural beauty and historic landmarks, the Grand Canyon has also been officially named America’s Most Deadly National Park.

Let’s dive into the details and find out exactly what goes on deep inside the Grand Canyon.

Grand canyon and man falling split imageShutterstock

Location

The Grand Canyon touches four states: Arizona, Nevada, Utah, and Colorado.

The most accessible and popular state to see the Grand Canyon is Arizona (South Rim) and Nevada (West Rim).

Grand Canyon South Rim photographed from Powell PointTuxyso, Wikimedia Commons

Brief History

The history of the Grand Canyon begins about six million years ago when the Colorado river slowly eroded the land beneath it forming the spectacularly deep canyon.

Spanish exploders discovered it way back in the 1540s.

Two Women Kayaking the Colorado River in Glen Canyon National Recreation AreaJim David, Shutterstock

Protected Status

The Grand Canyon became a protected forest reserve in 1893 at the orders of President Benjamin Harrison.

It became an official United States National Park in 1919.

Grayscale Photo of United States President Benjamin HarrisonPach Brothers, Wikimedia Commons

Size

Part of what makes the Grand Canyon so dangerous is its sheer size. The park sits on just over 1.2 million acres. It stretches more than 277 miles long, and 18 miles wide, with a whopping depth of 6,000 feet. 

There’s plenty of space to get lost in.

Landscape Photo of the Grand Canyon National ParkDietmar Rabich, CC BY-SA 4.0, Wikimedia Commons

Popularity

Millions of people visit the Grand Canyon each year. From scenic drives to daring hikes, the park is loaded with opportunities for people of all ages to enjoy.

From 2019-2021 there were about 14 million visitors counted.

Landscape Photo of the Grand CanyonAlex Proimos, CC BY 2.0, Wikimedia Commons

Danger Status

In late 2023, an investigation done by the New York Post found it to be the deadliest national park in the country.

The Grand Canyon is said to have the most missing persons in the nation.

A woman hiking near cliffs on Bright Angel trail, Grand CanyonThomas BLANCK, Shutterstock

Missing Persons

According to the NY Post report, there have been at least 56 people missing from the Grand Canyon within the last five years.

Photography of a man and a woman sitting on the edge of the rimFreebilly Photography, Shutterstock

Missing Persons: Reports

Aside from the 56, there were also 1,100 missing persons reports filed from the Grand Canyon, with most of them being found eventually.

Many of those people were found injured and unwell.

Landscape Photo of the Grand Canyon  people watching from topJosh Sorenson, Pexels

Missing Persons: Reasons

Although the majority of people who go missing in the Grand Canyon are assumed to be from getting lost, there are many other reasons people go missing in the park, such as kidnapping, running away, and attempts at ending their lives.

Unsolved Missing Persons Cases
There are several unsolved missing persons cases that involve the Grand Canyon, here are three of them:

Mary Begay, 1957: A 20-year-old woman was seen getting into a vehicle with two men and hasn’t been seen since.

Justin Richardson, 2011: A 13-year-old boy had hiked into the woods with friends and became separated. He was never located.

Landscape Photo of the Grand Canyon, man walking on pathwayRoma and Dasha, Pexels

Unsolved Missing Persons Cases: Continued

Adam Clayton Lyle Jones, 2011: A 23-year-old man’s belongings were found at the Visitor’s center. Evidence found itineraries for a road-trip, with the Grand Canyon being one of the places he set out to visit. He never returned to his vehicle and his body was never found.

What about the people who were found?

Landscape Photo of the Grand Canyon with people standing on cliffTom Fisk, Pexels

Fatalities

Over the years, there have been a concerning amount of people losing their lives within the boundaries of the Grand Canyon.

It’s an awful trend that has been steadily increasing since the park’s discovery.

Landscape Photo of the Grand Canyon hiking trailVincent Pelletier, Pexels

Fatalities: History

Since the 1800s, there have been a thousand deaths confirmed. Considering records from that far back are difficult to find, authorities believe the actual number to be much higher.

Let’s take a closer look at recent years.

Landscape Photo of the Grand Canyon, Cedar Ridge Ranger-led HikeGrand Canyon National Park's Photostream, Flickr

Fatalities: Recent Years

In 2022, eleven people lost their lives while visiting the Grand Canyon—which is half of what the previous year experienced.

It may not sound like much, but keep reading, it gets worse.

Landscape Photo of the Grand Canyon, South Kaibab Trail with hikersGrand Canyon National Park's Photostream, Flickr

Fatalities: During the Pandemic

In 2020, during the pandemic, visitors dropped by more than half. However, the number of fatalities held strong at 17.

After the pandemic, visitors started flooding into the park once again, and the fatalities jumped to 23 in 2021.

Landscape Photo of the Grand Canyon, South Kaibab Trail with hikersGrand Canyon National Park's Photostream, Flickr

Fatalities: Average

On average, there are 12 fatalities every year. Since 2008, the number of fatalities has never gone below 10.

The odds of falling off the rim of the Grand Canyon are 1 in 1.8 million visitors. So, what else causes all these fatalities?

Photo of the Grand Canyon Lodge on the North Rim of Grand CanyonGrand Canyon National Park, CC BY 2.0, Wikimedia Commons

How It Happens

According to data collected, there are several different ways that people lose their lives at the Grand Canyon—surprisingly, falling from the edge is not number one.

Landscape Photo of the Grand Canyon, North Rim, Muted Sunrise From Cape RoyalGrand Canyon National Park's Photostream, Flickr

Airplane & Helicopter Crashes

A total of 379 people have lost their lives in the Grand Canyon in airplane and helicopter crashes.

Aside from one major incident that claimed the lives of over 100 people, aircraft crashes still remain the most common cause of death in the Grand Canyon.

Landscape Photo of the Grand Canyon with a A helicopter in frontSergiy Galyonkin, Flickr

1956 Airplane Crash

In 1956, two commercial airplanes collided in mid-air over the canyon. Every single person aboard both airplanes lost their lives, totaling 128 people.

The Grand Canyon viewed from an Northwest Airbus A320 flying from Las Vegas to MemphisJérôme, CC BY-SA 3.0, Wikimedia Commons

1956 Airplane Crash: What Happened

Both planes were carrying passengers from California to the Midwest. The pilots were given permission to fly over the Grand Canyon as a “scenic route”, but were managing their own flight paths.

This horrific event is what led to the creation of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

Aerial Photo of the Grand CanyonMeRyan, CC BY 2.0, Wikimedia Commons

1986 Helicopter Crash

In 1986, an airplane and a helicopter collided while on sight-seeing tours, and all 25 people aboard lost their lives.

Papillon Helicopter and the Grand CanyonNevada Tourism Media Relations, Flickr

1986 Helicopter Crash: What Happened

It was not determined how the pilots did not see each other before colliding, but investigations revealed that too many tours were flying over the same parts at the same time.

To date, this is the deadliest helicopter accident in the United States.

Helicopter 368 is seen on top of a slab of slanted rock during a shorthaul mission to Zion National ParkGrand Canyon National Park's Photostream, Flickr

Aircraft Tours

Hundreds of thousands of visitors partake in aircraft tours over the Grand Canyon each year. There are two flights per minute, on average.

Most accidents occur with tour companies who have inexperienced pilots. The National Park Service hasn’t had an aerial accident in over 40 years.

Aerial Photo over the grand canyon, view from inside the planeReinaldo Simoes, Pexels

Falling Fatalities

It is assumed that falling is the leading cause of death at the Grand Canyon, and while it may not actually be number one, it is definitely number two.

It is important to note that the exact number is difficult to track as not everyone who comes into the park is counted, and solo hikers are not tracked.

Landscape Photo of the Grand Canyon with people watching mountain at daytimeJosh Sorenson, Pexels

Falling Fatalities: Details

There have been 123 reported fatal falls at the Grand Canyon.

Falls off the ledge: 60
Fallen from inside the canyon: 63

Grand Canyon National Park- Redwall LimestoneGrand Canyon National Park, CC BY 2.0, Wikimedia Commons

Environmental Fatalities

Environmental factors are a common cause of fatalities at the Grand Canyon. Many hikers are not prepared for the escalating elements within the park.

This includes high and low temperatures, weather conditions, and even starvation.

Landscape Photo of the Grand Canyon, Sinyala Rapids LedgeGrand Canyon National Park, CC BY 2.0, Wikimedia Commons

Dehydration

Temperatures in the Grand Canyon can reach extreme highs and lows. In the summer, temperatures reach 120 degrees Fahrenheit at the bottom of the canyon—leading to dehydration quickly.

Around 100 people have lost their lives after going into cardiac arrest resulting from dehydration.

Hikers Entering The Grand CanyonTerry Eiler, Wikimedia Commons

Overhydration

A lesser-known cause is overhydration—when people drink too much water, thinking they need it, and consuming too little food. This causes sodium in the blood to drop to dangerously low levels, leading to fatal consequences.

Grand Canyon National Park Grandview WalkGrand Canyon National Park, CC BY 2.0, Wikimedia Commons

Starvation

As with all fatalities at the Grand Canyon, this number is difficult to determine as there are many bodies at the bottom of the canyon that have yet to be discovered.

It is assumed that many lost hikers suffer starvation in their final days.

Landscape Photo of the Grand Canyon with hikers in frontDirk DBQ, CC BY 2.0, Wikimedia Commons

Starvation: Evidence

Some hikers have left behind notes that are found with their skeleton, stating “4 days without food or water. Lost.”

Some notes have also been found flying around the park, with no bodies to match them with.

Grand Canyon National Park South Kaibab TrailGrand Canyon National Park's Photostream, Flickr

Freezing

During the winter months, hikers are often unprepared for sudden changes in weather. At higher elevations there can be intermittent snowstorms that alter both the trails and the temperatures.

Frozen bodies of lost hikers have been found.

Grand Canyon National Park: Bright Angel Trail, Winter HikingGrand Canyon National Park's Photostream, Flickr

Flash Floods

The Grand Canyon is in the desert, meaning there is not much vegetation to soak up accumulated water. So, when it does rain, water flows quickly across the soil, causing flash floods in the side canyons.

Tathatso Wash during a Flash Flood EventGrand Canyon National Park's Photostream, Flickr

Flash Floods: Fatalities

Unsuspecting hikers can be instantly swept away to places they cannot recover from.

In 1997, two people drowned in a flash flood, while their hiking partners painfully watched them be swept away.

Grand Canyon Flood of 1966 Bright Angel CreekGrand Canyon National Park's Photostream, Flickr

Lightening

Only an hour after the flash flood drownings, two other visitors were struck by lightning. Reports state that lightning strikes an average of 25,000 times per year at the Grand Canyon.

Grand Canyon Flood of 1966 Bright Angel CanyonGrand Canyon National Park's Photostream, Flickr

Drowning Fatalities

There are dozens of water activities enjoyed in the Colorado River, including boating, swimming, river rafting and waterfall excursions.

But many visitors underestimate the power of the river.

Grand Canyon_Oar Boats on Colorado RiverGrand Canyon National Park's Photostream, Flickr

Drowning Fatalities: How It Happens

Back before bridges were built, many people drowned just trying to cross the river. Others were unexpectedly swept away in the current while simply cooling off in the river.

Drowning fatalities are estimated at around just over 100.

Girl jumping off one of the waterfalls Havasupai Indian Reservation, Grand Canyon, ArizonaHenrik Johansson, Flickr

Notable Drowning Incident of 1928

In 1928, a couple of newlyweds named Bessie and Glen Hyde were rafting down the river, attempting to make a new record for fastest time through the canyon.

Bessie would have been the first woman to raft through the canyon.

Landscape Photo of the Colorado River and Grand CanyonKenny X. Li, Flickr

Notable Drowning Incident of 1928: Unsolved Mystery

The newlyweds never made it to the end, and their bodies were never found.

Rumor has it that Bessie survived, and had purposely staged the incident to end her husband’s life. However, the mystery remains unsolved.

Rafting The Grand Canyon. Grand Canyon National Park, ArizonaPaxson Woelber, CC BY 2.0, Wikimedia Commons

Slayings

Realistically speaking, the Grand Canyon is a convenient place to take someone’s life and stage it as an accident.

Approximate 40 fatalities have been confirmed as purposeful, and at the hands of another person.

Landscape Photo of the Grand Canyon on sunsetPradeepBisht, CC BY-SA 4.0, Wikimedia Commons

Slayings: Robert Spangler

In 1993, Robert Spangler, later recognized as a confirmed serial-slayer, took his third wife to the Grand Canyon and pushed her off a 160-foot cliff.

At the time it was ruled an accident, but he later confessed to the incdent.

Landscape Photo of the Grand Canyon National ParkU.S. Department of the Interior, Flickr

Slaying: Mr. & Mirs. Sherman

In 1977, newlyweds Michael and Charlotte Sherman were found unalive by hikers. They had been shot. Investigators assume it was a robbery gone wrong.

The ruggedness and deep hues of the Grand Canyon are displayed against a deep blue sky.MichaelKirsh, CC BY-SA 4.0, Wikimedia Commons

Self-harm

An estimated total of 91 people have taken their own lives at the Grand Canyon, and in many different ways.

Seventy-five people have reportedly jumped to their demise off the edges of cliffs, and another 13 people have driven off the edge in their car.

Landscape Photo of the Grand Canyon, Guys On The Edge Of The Grand CanyonJoe Shlabotnik, Flickr

Self-harm Notable Incidents of 1993

In 1993 alone, three different people drove their vehicles off the edge of the Grand Canyon.

These incidents happened shortly after the movie Thelma and Louise premiered—where the main characters drove off the edge of a cliff at the end of the movie.

Jeep at Grand Canyon, Whitmore Canyon Overlookcarfull...from Wyoming, Flickr

Self-harm Incidents

Aside from jumping, other people have taken their own lives by jumping off bridges, jumping out of helicopters, and using firearms.

Some people have left notes to explain, others had witnesses.

Bridge Across The Grand CanyonDon Graham, CC BY-SA 2.0, Wikimedia Commons

Car Accidents

There isn’t a whole lot of data to support car accidents that happen at the Grand Canyon, but it is worth noting as a common cause of fatalities.

There were three notable incidents in recent years that occurred on roadways within the park.

Grand Canyon with Navajo Nation police out in forceQuinn Dombrowski, Flickr

Car Accidents: Notable Incident 2023

In February of 2023, two visitors from Portugal lost their lives while on vacation at the Grand Canyon. They were backseat passengers and not wearing their seatbelts.

The vehicle collided with a bus and rolled over. The passengers on the bus were not injured.

Grand Canyon National Park South Entrance StationGrand Canyon National Park's Photostream, Flickr

Car Accidents: Notable Incident 2022

In 2022, a woman suffered fatal injuries when her vehicle crashed into a tree near the South Entrance Station.

Grand Canyon National Park's South Entrance SignGrand Canyon National Park, CC BY 2.0, Wikimedia Commons

Car Accidents: Notable Incident 2014

Back in 2014, two vehicles collided on South Entrance Road, only 3 miles from the entrance, resulting in fatalities of all passengers involved.

Grand Canyon National Park - South Entrance LineGrand Canyon National Park's Photostream, Flickr

Unusual Fatalities: Fear

Believe it or not, in 1933 a 43-year-old man—who was terrified of snakes—met a rattlesnake on the trail. When the snake coiled and made a partial attack, the man was so scared that he leapt back in fear and ended up experiencing heart failure in that moment, and did not survive.

Sadly, his family were witnesses to the incident.

Landscape Photo of Grand Canyon National ParkPaxson Woelber, CC BY 2.0, Wikimedia Commons

Unusual Fatalities: Rock Falls

It is estimated that around eight people have lost their lives in the Grand Canyon from rockfalls. One woman narrowly escaped fatal bleeding when a rock fell on her tent and crushed her pelvis. Thankfully, she was saved.

Grand Canyon National Park Basement RocksGrand Canyon National Park's Photostream, Flickr

Unusual Fatalities: Parachuting

In 1993, two people risked their luck when they parachuted off the edge of the Grand Canyon into the Little Colorado River Gorge.

Unfortunately, they were too close together when they jumped and their parachutes became entangled. They hit the rocks 900 feet below at high speed. Only one of them survived.

Short-haul training with a simulated patientGrand Canyon National Park's Photostream, Flickr

The Unknown Numbers

The numbers are scary, but is even more terrifying is how many unknowns there are.

Unless witnesses are present when someone goes over the edge, the bodies can go undiscovered for a very, very long time.

Landscape Photo of the Grand Canyon National ParkSimona Corvaro, Flickr

The Unknown Numbers: Example

In 2021, the remains of a 56-year-old man were found. He had been missing since 2015.

Landscape Photo of Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona, United StatesIslander61, CC BY-SA 4.0, Wikimedia Commons

The Unknown: Human Remains

As well, human remains found in the canyon cannot always be identified and properly linked to a missing person.

There are often skeletons found in heavily wooded areas that had obviously been there for long periods of time, making it difficult to determine the cause of their demise.

Grand Canyon National Park ArizonaMferbfriske, CC BY-SA 2.0, Wikimedia Commons

Known Incidents in 2023

There were apparently 11 fatalities at the Grand Canyon in 2023. Here are seven of those incidents:

11/16/23: A 65-year-old man from Oracle was hiking from the South Rim to the river and back when he was found unresponsive.

9/9/23: A 55-year-old man from Virginia was attempting to hike from the South to North Rim in a single day when he collapsed and became unresponsive.

Grand Canyon National Park: Rim Trail (South Rim)Grand Canyon National Park's Photostream, Flickr

Known Incidents in 2023: Continued

8/1/23: One person lost their life and over 50 others were injured when a bus rolled over at Grand Canyon West.

7/2/23: A 57-year-old woman was doing an 8-mile hike when she fell unconscious and passed from the extreme temperatures, which had reached over 100 degrees.

Skywalk at Grand Canyon West Ridge in the Grand Canyon National ParkRichard Martin, Flickr

Known Incidents in 2023: Continued

6/5/23: A 33-year-old man ended his own life after jumping off the edge of the Sky Walk, falling 4,000 feet into the canyon at Grand Canyon West.

5/21/23: A 36-year-old woman from Indiana was attempting to do a day hike to the Colorado River when she collapsed on the trail.

2/17/23: A 56-year-old man from Wisconsin was found unalive on the Bright Angel Trail below Havasupai Gardens. He was attempting a day hike from the rim to the Colorado River and back.

View of the Grand Canyon Skywalk from afarGrand Canyon Skywalk, Flickr

Known Incidents in 2022

There were 11 fatalities at the Grand Canyon National Park in 2022. Here are nine of the incidents:

12/3/22: A 54-year-old man lost his life in a rappelling accident while canyoneering. This type of activity is normally done in a group due to the danger, but this man was on a solo trip. Park officials found his abandoned campsite and vehicle and began a search until they found his body.

Bright Angel Point Search and Rescue Recovery-AugustGrand Canyon National Park's Photostream, Flickr

Known Incidents in 2022: Continued

9/10/22: A 67-year-old man fell off a boat and into the Colorado River. Members of his group pulled him out of the water and began CPR but he could not be resuscitated. Four others on the boat sustained nonfatal injuries.

Grand Canyon National Park, Colorado River Black BridgeGrand Canyon National Park's Photostream, Flickr

Known Incidents in 2022: Continued

8/26/22: A 44-year-old man fell 200 feet from the rim west of the Bright Angel Point Trail on the North Rim. He was off trail when he accidentally fell off the edge.

9/4/22: A 59-year-old woman from Arizona lost her life hiking Thunder River Trail. She became disoriented and fell unconscious while on a multi-day backpacking trip. It was over 100 degrees out that day. Attempts to revive her were unsuccessful.

Tapeats Creek as seen from the Thunder River TrailGrand Canyon National Park's Photostream, Flickr

Known Incidents in 2022: Continued

8/26/22: A 44-year-old man was allegedly off the trail when he accidentally slipped off the North Rim edge and fell to his demise. His body was found 200 feet below near the Bright Angel Trail.

6/11/22: A 47-year old woman from Chicago fell into the Colorado River during a commercial river trip. She was cooling off along Pipe Creek Beach, when she was caught by the current.

Grand Canyon National Park, North Rim - Bright Angel PointGrand Canyon National Park's Photostream, Flickr

Known Incidents in 2022: Continued

6/2/22: A 41-year-old woman from Canada was found unresponsive on the Bright Angel Trail. Bystanders attempted CPR and were soon assisted by the National Park Service, but the hiker did not make it. It was 104 degrees out.

Grand Canyon National Park Bright Angel TrailGrand Canyon National Park, CC BY 2.0, Wikimedia Commons

Known Incidents in 2022: Continued

4/4/22: A 34-year-old woman from Utah lost her life after falling from a private boating trip. She fell 20 feet near the Ledges Camp along the Colorado River and sustained fatal injuries.

She was on day six of her trip, and had hiked into the canyon to meet her group when she fell. People administered CPR but no luck.

Landscape Photo of the Grand Canyon National Park Ledge CampsiteGrand Canyon National Park's Photostream, Flickr

Known Incidents in 2022: Continued

3/24/22: A 68-year-old woman from Colorado fell overboard while whitewater rafting, nine days into her trip. She fell near Hance Rapid in the Colorado River, and people pulled her out and attempted CPR, but sadly, she did not make it.

Grand Canyon National Park, Hance RapidGrand Canyon National Park's Photostream, Flickr

Demographics

The two demographics most likely to lose their lives at the Grand Canyon are young, and male. This assumption is made on the grounds that men typically take bigger risks.

Of 55 people who accidentally fell from the Grand Canyon, 39 of them were male. Eight of them were hopping along the rocks and lost footing, or posing for pictures.

Landscape Photo of the Grand Canyon National ParkBernard Spragg. NZ, Flickr

Another Notable Incident: Risk Takers

A 38-year-old man from Texas was playfully hopping along the rocks, pretending to scare his daughter when he lost his footing and really did fall 400 feet to his demise.

Grand Canyon National Park, Yavapai Point RainbowGrand Canyon National Park's Photostream, Flickr

Safety Tips: Trails and Water

Although it is clear that the Grand Canyon can be a dangerous place, there are still millions of visitors each year. For those visitors, it is important to take precautionary steps to stay safe.

Stay on Designated Trails: Venturing off-trail risks getting lost, or falling from unstable ledges.

Bring Plenty of Water: Dehydration is a serious risk at the Grand Canyon. Sweating is very common. Bring lots of water, and eat salty snacks throughout your day.

Grand Canyon National Park, Tonto TrailGrand Canyon National Park's Photostream, Flickr

Safety Tips: Weather

Dress Appropriately: Dress for the weather, and the terrain. Wear layers so you can add or take off, and wear sturdy hiking shoes. Hats, sunglasses and sunscreen are also recommended.

Check the Weather Forecast: Always check the weather forecast before your trip so you can avoid flash floods, extreme heat, and snowstorms.

Grand Canyon Flood of 1966 Bright Angel CanyonGrand Canyon National Park's Photostream, Flickr

Safety Tips: Travel Tips

Travel in Groups: Traveling in groups can reduce the risk of getting lost, or experiencing accidents while hiking. Bring a friend, or join a guided tour.

Bring a Map and Compass: Getting lost is a serious concern at the Grand Canyon. Be prepared by knowing your route. GPS devices are not always accurate in some spots of the park, so a paper map is suggested.

The South Kaibab, Bright Angel, and North Kaibab Trails known as the Corridor TrailsGrand Canyon NPS, CC BY 2.0, Wikimedia Commons

Final Thoughts

As horrifying as the numbers in this article may be, we hope it does not discourage anyone from visiting the stunning landscapes of the Grand Canyon National Park, one of the Seven Wonders of the World.

Just be sure to adhere by all safety protocols, and make smart decisions.

Pre-dawn sky over the South Rim of the Grand CanyonDiana Robinson, Flickr

Sources: 1, 2


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